The right medicine: Two generations, one profession

The right medicine: Two generations, one profession

“Dr Adams was able to break down my dreams into bite-size pieces”

Dr Rosmond Adams is a leading doctor and professor in St Vincent and the Grenadines. Nicole Nation, is a disability activist and medical student from Jamaica. Together, they tell Leading Change about being part of the Queen’s Young Leaders Mentoring programme.

2 profile pictures of Rosmond Adams and Nicole Nation

What were you expecting from a mentor?

Nicole: I wanted an accountability partner, for sure – someone who would ensure I did what I said I was going to do. But I also wanted someone who was objective and critical when it came to providing feedback about the projects I had in mind.

What were your first impressions?

Rosmond: I could hear passion in her voice. She talked me through her struggles, her achievements and her plans. As a physician from the same region it was no surprise that the programme connected us.

Nicole: I thought it was great that he was in the medical profession as his advice would not be confined to the projects I wanted to complete, but also cover how best to navigate my way through medicine.

How did the mentoring work?

“A lot of the goals that I had in mind have since been achieved.”

Nicole: There were several mechanisms in place to ensure we did what we said we were going to do. A lot of the goals that I had in mind have since been achieved. Dr Adams not only matched, but fuelled my passion. So that was essential in ensuring that I kept the momentum going.

Rosmond: Nicole would tell me of her ideas and her projects. She has designed numerous projects to reach people with disabilities – from children to adults.

How did your mentor help?

“…not just telling her what to do, it was a learning experience.”

Nicole: I think Dr Adams was able to break down my dreams into bite-size pieces.

I recall mentioning I would love to have a disability clinic here in Jamaica. I was so excited. Dr Adams reminded me that this seemed more of a long-term goal – something that I could achieve when I was more advanced in my career.

However, for the interim, he pointed out simple possible actions – such as building a wheelchair ramp on a current clinic, with the aim of slowly transforming it into what I had envisioned.

What have you gained from being a mentor?

Rosmond: Being a mentor to Nicole was not just telling her what to do, it was a learning experience.

It was an experience filled with hope, aspiration, and love for humanity – especially for those who suffer from disabilities.

Find out more about mentoring Queen's Young Leaders on our FAQs page

Back to Mentoring Queen's Young Leaders: Our stories